The 1899 Wright Inn Asheville Bed and Breakfast

O.B. Wright House

Biltmore Estste at Christmas.

Biltmore Candlelight Special

13735_171936836238_145337261238_2936875_6015514_n[1]

Our Holiday Biltmore Estate Package includes 2 daytime tickets (good for 2 consecutive days) to The Biltmore Estate including the Gardens, Antler  Hill Village and Winery. 


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

For guests staying at our bed and breakfast inn for three+ (3) consecutive weekday evenings (Mon-Thursday),  we will provide 2 FREE Upgrades to The Biltmore Candlelight Extravaganza! Experience this beautiful home lit only by candlelight and firelight.

Biltmore Estate Candlelight

 

 

These passes MUST BE scheduled in advance due to being Date/Time specific, so please call (828) 251-0789 to reserve your tickets and request an entry time.

Tickets are reduced to $50.00 (per Ticket+tax). Candlelight Upgrades are NO CHARGE for our three night guests.

Offered November 30, 2014 through January 3, 2015.

 

download

 

Welcome to the Wright Inn Bed and Breakfast

“Home of the Week” award winner.

Recently, our premier Asheville bed and breakfast inn, 1899 Wright Inn & Carriage House, was nominated for and received the honor of being named as Asheville’s “Home of the Week“.

Having the Asheville Citizen-Times award us with this honor and publish a special article and  is a very nice way to recognize this beautiful historical home

We are the 5th couple to have had the honor of caring for this beautiful piece of history.  

O.B. Wright House NPS Photo

O.B. Wright House

 Each of the preceding innkeepers brought their own style and personality to the property.  As stated in previous “Blogs” The Wright Inn and Carriage House is celebrating it’s 25 Anniversary as being a bed and breakfast. One little known fact is that it served as a home for many people prior to it’s latest life as a bed and Breakfast inn by housing borders for at least 50 of it’s previous years. We have had numerous folks stay with us that lived here in the 40′s, 50′s and 60′s. Sharing their memories and hearing the stories they relay to us is very interesting.

 

 Come stay with us and experience the feel and ambiance of a more gentle period in time.


635520929486701747-WRIGHTINN-0036 Wright Inn "Home of the Week"

Asheville B&B Fall Greeting

The Builder of the 1899 Wright Inn Bed and Breakfast

-George F. Barber –

Builder of the  

1899 Wright Inn and Carriage House

George F. Barber

One of the many interesting facts about The 1899 Wright Inn is that it was designed by architect George Franklin Barber (1854-1915.)  Barber is known for his residential designs which he marketed through a series of mail-order catalogs; sort of the front runner to the Sears and Roebuck Craftsman style houses. 

He was born in DeKalb, Illinois and began his designing career there.  He learned architecture through mail-order books.  In the mid 1880s he produced his first architectural designs while working at his brother’s construction firm.

Around 1888, came The Cottage Souvenir, containing fourteen house plans on punched card stock and tied together with a piece of yarn.

Due to his declining health he moved to the mountains of Knoxville, Tennessee, about this same time.  He became a business partner in the Edgewood Land Improvement Company, which was developing a suburb east of Knoxville known as Park City, and now known as Parkridge.  He designed over a dozen houses for this suburb which included his own home that still stands at 1635 Washington Avenue.

Business really began to take flight when The Cottage Souvenir No. 2 that contained fifty-nine house plans along with plans for barns, a chapel, a church, several pavilions and storefronts.  I can imagine Osella and Leva sitting down and going through an early catalog and choosing the plan that would become their home and eventually 1899 The Wright Inn and Carriage House.

Around 1895 Barber formed a new firm with Thomas Klutz and began publishing a magazine called American Homes that beside the usual house plans, offered tips on interior design and landscaping.

By the early 1900s, Barber had designed the home of C.L. Post, R.J. Reynolds, and one of his grandest designs, the $40,000 home for tycoon Walter G. Newman in Barboursville, VA.

At this time, he began to phase out his mail order business to focus on building projects.    In 1902, American Homes moved to New York, but Barber stayed a regular contributor for several years.  The catalog business was suspended in 1908 after selling upwards of 20,000 plans.

Most of Barber’s business was catalog architecture; but his great innovation was his willingness to personalize his designs of which the Wright Inn shows changes from his original plans.

Barber’s philosophy was that no place should adhere more closely to principles of nature than one owns house.  He considered proportion the most important element and described ornamentation as the expression.  To him, harmony of form also being important was the relationship of curved and straight lines to one another.

Early designs were modified versions of Queen Anne style which he liked to enrich with Romanesque elements.  His creations featured imposing turrets, projecting windows, verandas flanked by circular pavilions.   His later designs offered more plans in the Colonial Revival style that offered projecting porticos, supported by large columns, symmetrical facades and flat decks.   He also offered bungalow and Craftsman style houses but few were built.

Some people think of Barber as the first to sell prefabricated houses in crates.  But it seems he did not do any manufacturing. Occasionally he supplied builders with staircases, doors and windows and many millwork companies advertised in his magazine. It is not clear whether entire houses were sold as kits by anyone prior to 1900.

George Franklin Barber died in 1915.  Since he learned architecture from books and sold his plans through catalogs, I can’t help but think he could really have used Amazon a lot during his lifetime.

He most likely never saw most of the houses that were created from his plans, but had he seen this grand house I feel he would be proud. 

Bed and Breakfast Street Appeal

The 1899 Wright Inn and Carriage House celebrates 25 years as the Premier Bed and Breakfast in Asheville

The 1899 Wright Inn and Carriage House celebrates 25 years as one of the finest bed and breakfasts in Asheville.

In 1899, Osella and Leva Wright moved into this beautiful home.  Levinia (Leva) lived here until her death in 1946.  After that time, the house became a boarding house and then the home of an elderly lady living here on her own.

In April 1989, the house opened as the Wright Inn and Carriage House after a complete renovation by the Siler Family under the direction of the Griffin architectural firm.  It has been a bed and breakfast inn ever since.  We are the 5th family of innkeepers who have welcomed guests to this home.  In July of this year, we will have been here an amazing ten years.I often think of how lonely Mrs. Wright must have been alone in this house; and how she had to welcome genteel boarders to help her survive financially.  During the period of its’ life, the next owners, the Banks Family, ran a not-so-genteel boarding house. It was during this period of ownership that the house became known as “Faded Glory” . This area turned into a not so nice area of town.

As the Montford Historic Area began to spring back to life, so did the Wright House.  With loving care it was restored to its former glory and stands ready to welcome you for its 25th anniversary year.  It now stands as a majestic link to the past in a wonder, old neighborhood.  I know Mrs. Wright would welcome the company.

Watch for some anniversary specials; and come and help us celebrate an amazing history here at the 1899 Wright Inn and Carriage House.